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How gossip, often viewed as harmless fun, can ruin careers.

Gossip and the Destruction of Careers

Gossip and the Destruction of CareersDoes your career have a worm embedded in it, destroying it secretly, as you perform the tasks you believe will assure success? Nothing makes standing in a supermarket line more enjoyable than reading the tabloids, finding out some gossip on the celebrity of our choice. And it's so innocent, harmful to no one. As a matter of fact, it seems the more gossip piled on an individual in those pages, the higher the salary they're able to command for their next project. But you can be assured, this equation doesn't apply to you. Gossip not only will not enhance your salary, it has the potential to take it away completely. I've seen it all, wherever people gather under one roof for a common purpose. The common purpose is the employer's. Everyone else is there to provide for their families and themselves. But so very often, these factors fade in importance to issues that are the shame of human nature, the destruction of the other. I've seen individuals attempt to create hardship for others and their families because the person reminded them of a past spouse. Though it offers little solace, if you find yourself the target of a sustained, vicious gossip campaign, you probably possess positive qualities your attackers lack. Jealousy is at the root of much of this. Those viewed as inferior are generally dismissed by the gossip channel as stupid or silly, and rarely generate malice. We all know the value of education, but there are those who will orchestrate your downfall because you've attained something they envy. It's much easier to sabotage someone with an education superior to yours than it is to attend classes, write papers and take tests. Of course, this possibility strikes many as an unlikely outcome. After all, the more educated you are, the higher you'll rise in the organization, thus finding protection in your academic efforts. But companies seldom adhere to the organizational charts that seem so comforting. There is an informal network of influence that can bring you to your knees through the effects of a thousand cuts. Long term employees, some malicious, some bored and in search of excitement, excitement that will not harm them in the eyes of their employer, have created deep cover channels of gossip. These are capable of ruining a person's effectiveness on the job without him or her ever gaining an inkling of what has transpired. Those engaged in these channels know their effectiveness is dependent on the subject of their ire remaining ignorant. This prevents any action being taken that can either prove the allegations false or worse yet, the victim going to a higher authority, possibly exposing the members of the channel. I know of a case where a director, who was initially viewed as a star, in the course of a few weeks couldn't elicit a hello from the janitorial staff. It was only after he was a marked man that someone, after a few drinks, took pity on him. Because his life didn't provide the information necessary to do the job, lies were freely circulated by a number of enemies he didn't know existed. He was informed that it was common knowledge he met a female employee a few blocks from work each evening to take her to a motel. He was supposed to be having sexual relations with another female employee in his office. Gossip is the great equalizer in the workplace. Character assassination can dissolve your degrees and accomplishments in the eyes of others, making you far less than those who didn't bother with an education. I'm always amused when I read an article by an expert in the field of employment who tells you to carefully assess your faults if you're experiencing difficulty in an organization. The logic underlying such advice is clear. Companies are pristine environments and if you aren't fitting in, obviously you have a problem that needs to be addressed. I too am familiar with the types of organizations they're describing. They exist in the grad school textbooks. I've never encountered such an organization outside of those pages. And remember, it's usually the victim that questions him or herself incessantly. Advising them to continue to do so can have negative consequences. The victimizers seldom engage in such soul searching. Their acts, always self serving, are couched in concern for the good of the organization. Why would an employer allow behavior so contrary to group cohesion to persist. Believe it or not, it does help create cohesion, at least among those participating in the channel. There are other employers who find the supposed knowledge about someone they see everyday alluring. Since others are not aware of the actual gossip, they develop a negative view of the target through complaints about work related matters. Frequently, the group will take a hypercritical view of the person's work output, going over it with a fine tooth comb. These are the reports that find their way to the employer. This is the reason the person has entered a period of insecurity. He or she has been devoured, carcass thrown to the pavement. Satisfaction permeates the organization for a while, momentary satiation. But they wait in deep cover, on the lookout for a member of the herd separated from the pack, far from the leaders. But patience must be exercised. Complaining too frequently gets you labeled a complainer. The channel and its offshoots lose effectiveness with overuse

A Resume Sample Will Give You A Clear Idea Of What Will Best Suit Your Needs.

A Resume Sample Will Give You A Clear Idea Of What Will Best Suit Your Needs.

Any good sample resume will have the following sections. This section is devoted to giving various ideas for great resume writing.Clearly stat job objectivesHighlight qualificationsDirectly relevant skills and experience.Work history.Relevant education and training.Choosing The Right Resume Format:There are different types of resume formats available. Choose the best format that suits the job you are applying for.Chronological Format:The primary organizing principle of this format is your employment record advancing in a particular career direction. Choose this format when you have clear cut qualifications and you are opting for a new job position in the same field.Functional Format:This format is suitable for candidates who are starting or changing their career. Your key skills, knowledge and related accomplishments are the primary organizing principle of this format with proof and prediction of your ability to contribute in your future job. You can also have a combinational format by combining the features of both formats.In our website you can find some of the most important information that should be included in your resume. These are elements that an employer will look for, regardless of the number of years of experience you have. Advice for Computer Software Engineers, Architects, Sales Executives, Administrator, Pharmacists, Nurses, Teachers, Construction workers etc are given for your benefit. This information will help you to prepare an original and unique resume. Be sure that you are not simply copying a resume format that you happen to find appealing.Instead of copying, consider your sample resume choice very carefully. Pick and choose the concepts and information or parts of any of these sample resumes that best fits your unique resume. Select the format that most emphasizes your strengths and achievements and excludes or reduces your weaknesses. Your resume needs to impress the recruiter or hiring manager enough to get you an interview.

Someone Else

Someone Else

"I'm sorry, but I have to vent. It was a horrible day at work," began my friend on our monthly catch-up call. "We've all been there," I offered. "Yeah, but not like this." As a substitute instructional aid, she'd been asked to assist teachers on a field trip for 275 fifth graders to celebrate the successful completion of a testing week. Her bus was the last unloaded and by the time she entered the skating rink, it was chaos.Teachers were standing, arms crossed, griping that no one from the administration was there to organize the event; no one told them what was suppose to happen; and no one had alerted the rink to their coming. While all legitimate concerns, being angry, frustrated and absorbed in their own plight meant no one was dealing with scores of eleven-year-olds rushing to grab skates, ripping open snacks, pushing to get sodas and throwing trash on the floor."I was utterly horrified," my friend told me. After watching for several minutes, she decided to recruit a teacher and the two of them began organizing students and assigning tasks to teachers. She did what people who are winning at working do. They act.In twenty years in management, I've seen people waiting, watching and hoping someone else would step up, take ownership and make things happen. I've seen people stuck in blame-gear while others are doing the work and solving the problems. And I've seen people hesitating while others are committing. No surprise these were the same people complaining in my office when others received bigger increases, better assignments, or more interesting projects.You see, people who are winning at working become the someone else that others are waiting for. They step up and do something. They know when to act, and they feel better about themselves when they do. That's because action feels better than inaction and commitment feels better than non-commitment. Both build your self-esteem.So, here's my bottom-line: you can't be winning at working if you're waiting for someone else to be the someone you could be. In my way of thinking, winning at working means you commit to offering the best you there is. Sometimes that means you have to dig a little deeper for your courage or push yourself outside your comfort zone. Sometimes it means you have to handle 275 out of control children when you're the lowest ranking person around. But it's like Shakespeare said, "Nothing comes from doing nothing."(c) 2005 Nan S. Russell. All rights reserved. Sign up to receive Nan's free biweekly eColumn at http://www.winningatworking.com. Nan Russell has spent over twenty years in management, most recently with QVC as a Vice President. She has held leadership positions in Human Resource Development, Communication, Marketing and line Management. Nan has a B.A. from Stanford University and M.A. from the University of Michigan. Currently working on her first book, Winning at Working: 10 Lessons Shared, Nan is a writer, columnist, and speaker. Visit http://www.nanrussell.com or contact Nan at info@nanrussell.com

changing careers

changing careers

Sometime in your life, you might decide that your current career is leading nowhere, or you might just be tired of doing the same old thing and feel that something better is waiting to be explored. Whatever your reasons for making a change in your career, it is important to take things into consideration. 1. Pay Increase or Pay Cut: Will your career change lead to a pay increase or a pay cut? It is important to consider this option in order to plan for your budget. If you have debts or any recurring payments such as a mortgage, car payments, cell phone bills, etc., you would need to know that you would still be able to afford these luxuries. 2. Location: Will you have to move in order to make the career change? This is another question that you have to take into consideration. Some people can move within their companies to do different things, others might have to physically move to a new company to make the change. Due to an increase in gas prices, being located near your principal place of business is important. If you are close to your job, you can easily save on gas. 3. Finding the right career: Have you done your research as to what career your want to change to? Do you know what will make you happy? Finding the right career is important to being happy and staying at a particular company. It is important to find a job that you will enjoy; otherwise you will just end up switching companies or switching careers all over again. When asked the question "What's more important, the job or the money?" how would you answer? 4. Skills: What skills do you have that can be useful to your new career? Most soft skills such as communication and interpersonal skills will always be useful to a company. Any managerial skills and technical skills will definitely help out as well. Being in the 21st century, technical skills can definitely be useful in almost every type of career you may decide to switch to. 5. Education, Training, and Certifications: Will your new career lead to more education and training? How much time and money will it take to get to where you want to be? Like most jobs, you learn by doing. But with other jobs, you may need to get more education, training, and certifications in order to get you to where you want to be. With some careers, you may be able to easily pick up on the daily activities, other careers you may need to get some professional training and/or certifications in order to get considered for the position. Whatever the case may be, be sure to research what is in demand for that particular career. 6. Using your contacts / Networking: The best possible way to find your new career is to utilize your contacts. The people that you know may be the very people that can put in a good word for you or to give you advice as to what you should do or what industry you should get into. Other ways to broaden your network is to join different organizations or associations. If possible and available, go through your alumni association. These are some helpful tips for you to consider before switching careers. Always remember that the choices that you make can either break or make you. Be bold and take risks. If you are unhappy with where you're at, do something about. Otherwise you may end up asking yourself "what if...?" This way you'll know that at least you tried.Postmeup.comhttp://www.postmeup.com

Blowing Your Own Leadership Horn

PERMISSION TO REPUBLISH: This article may be republished in newsletters and on web sites provided attribution is provided to the author, and it appears with the included copyright, resource box and live web site link. Email notice of intent to publish is appreciated but not required: mail to: brent@actionleadership.comWord count:679 Blowing Your Own Leadership Hornby Brent FilsonThere are two streams of competitiveness running through every organization. The first goes outward: It's the organization's competitive activities toward its competitors. The second goes inward: It's the competitiveness of leaders inside the organization who are vying against one another for power, recognition, privilege and promotion. To be successful in the second, leaders must not only do well in their jobs but they must also be able to have their bosses and colleagues perceive they do well. In other words, they must be able to publicize themselves -- or, to use the vernacular, blow their own horns.I submit, however, that if one simply puts lips to the horn of publicity and blows hard -- i.e., makes an outward show of publicizing oneself -- such efforts will turn out to be discordant and counterproductive. The result will be people turning their backs on you rather than having them hum your tune. Though it is necessary to blow one's own horn as you climb your career ladder, it is also necessary to know how to do it. After all, there is an art to the effort. Here are four steps that you can follow.(1) Identify an area in your organization that needs better results. The art involves not just selecting the right results but doing so in cooperation with others. Make sure that when you shine light on the lack of results, you do not embarrass somebody who has been tasked to get those results. Instead of making beautiful music, you could end up on somebody's enemies list! Get the responsible person's permission to focus on the area. (2) Put together a team whose task it is to achieve those results. Blowing your own horn means that you want to be seen, not as the Lone Ranger, but as a team player. Ensure the results can be achieved with a team. Enlist members to join the team by giving leadership talks. (What's in it for them to be part of the team?) Be aware, as you form the team, of any hard feelings or rough edges that might surface between and among team members and others in your organization who have a stake in the results. If you lead an endeavor that causes hard feelings, it's better to have never started it in the first place. Moreover, the new team must be not only be formed, it must be MARKETED. Both of these efforts require communications tools and skills, which can take numerous forms. First, to describe the new team or service, communications must be employed to fully define its purpose and operating principles, and the people who are involved in it. These communications tools are descriptive in nature and may include everything from biographical back-grounders to product descriptions and data sheets.(3) Achieve the results. Execution and achievement of the targeted results is absolutely critical to this phase of horn blowing. Make sure you score a win even if it's only a partial win. The idea is to get the low hanging fruit at the outset to show others that your team is succeeding, and then go for the bigger results later. (4) Publicize the results. This is one of the most important steps of all, and it is a step that few leaders follow. They might put together a team that gets a few wins, but they have no idea how to publicize their efforts. The first rule in this is: To blow your own horn most effectively, make sure YOU DON'T TAKE CREDIT FOR THE RESULTS -- YOUR TEAM MEMBERS TAKE CREDIT INSTEAD! Your efforts will get torpedoed if they look at all self-serving. To highlight the successful products and services achieved by your team, you can put together white papers, data sheets, presentation papers and case-history articles.Don't make this a one-time effort. You must be continually looking for results that are flagging, putting together teams to achieve the results, then marketing and publicizing the achievements. In this way, when you blow your horn in your organization, the music you'll be making can accompany you on a fast-rising career-trajectory.

Nurse Training and Education

There is a growing demand for workers in the health care industry. The demand is only expected to increase as baby boomers age, increasing their need for health care while at the same time retiring from these positions in record numbers. The outlook for those interested in a career in nursing is very good. Although the education required to become a nurse is intensive, the pay scale is lucrative and many hospitals provide tuition reimbursement.The education requirements for nursing include both theoretical and practical experience. The theoretical work includes classroom education, and covers subjects such as chemistry, nutrition and anatomy. The practical work provides the student nurse with hands-on supervised training in the clinical setting. Once you have completed the nursing training from an approved nursing school you are required to take, and pass, the NCLEX-RN, a licensing exam. Upon passing the exam you are awarded your RN license.There are a variety of roads to becoming a registered nurse. Many community colleges offer an associate program. Using this program, you can have a nursing license in two to three years. It is also an economical choice, as most community colleges are substantially less expensive than a traditional four year state or private school. If you choose the four year degree, you will graduate with a B.S.N. or Bachelor of Science in Nursing. You will still be a RN, and must still pass the licensing exam before earning the right to wear your scrubs. The benefit of obtaining a bachelors degree is that the four year degree is required for many supervisory positions within the nursing field, and you must have a B.S.N to receive your master's degree. Many colleges now offer a fast track program to allow those with their RN to complete their B.S.N. in a short amount of time, attending classes part time or over the internet.Master's degree programs in nursing allow a nurse to receive a higher level of compensation as well as the capability to work with more autonomy. A master's program also allows the nurse to specialize in the type of nursing that he or she prefers. There are master's programs available in clinical specialties, such as a nurse anesthetist or a nurse practitioner. Many schools also allow a nurse to enter the teaching field with a master's degree. A master's program in nursing, regardless of the specialization, typically requires two years of coursework. A nurse may also choose to earn his or her doctorate degree in nursing, which would open up many administration level jobs as well as the ability to teach in any college.Nursing programs are approved by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. To ensure that you are properly prepared for the licensing exam that you must pass before becoming an RN, choose a school that is fully accredited. This means, among other things, that their curriculum has been examined and determined to cover the material that is included in the NCLEX-RN exam.Given the fact that there is a shortage of nurses, and the demand is growing, it may seem that getting accepted to nursing school should be easier; this is unfortunately not the case. In fact, one of the reasons that there is a shortage of nurses is because there is also a shortage of nurse educators. Because nursing requires such detailed and extensive education, it is important to have a low student to teacher ratio. With a shortage of nurse educators, schools are limited in the number of nursing students that they can accept. The shortage of nursing educators is partially due to the fact that nurses can earn much better wages working in the clinical setting than in the college setting.With the shortage of nursing educators, acceptance to nursing schools has become very competitive. There are several things that you can do to increase your odds of being accepted to nursing school. The first, of course, is to have the highest GPA and standardized test scores as possible. If you are seriously considering nursing school, it may be too late to improve your GPA, but if your standardized tests are not where you want them, consider investing in a test prep course and retake the exam.Another way that you can make yourself more attractive to a nursing program is to take some classes at your local community college. Showing that you have the ability to complete college level work can go a long way in persuading the admissions board that you are a good candidate for their nursing program. Finally, consider spending time as a volunteer in the health care field. Many people want to enter nursing because of the ready supply of jobs and lucrative pay. When they realize the hard work that is required, they drop out of the nursing program. By volunteering in the field, the acceptance committee will feel more confident that you will remain in the program.

Summary

How gossip, often viewed as harmless fun, can ruin careers.